All posts by Leslie C

08Mar/17

Medications

My mother is diabetic is on a few medications. I asked her if she knew exactly what medications she was on and she only knew the name of metformin. She is also on a station (atorvastatin) but didn’t know the name besides calling it “the cholesterol pill”. Also, she mentioned that she is taking a little, long blue pill. This pill is glimepiride. So, I then (even thought I’ve been through this with her before) had to go through why she was on a cholesterol pill even though she doesnt have cholesterol issues per se. This is for cardiac risk that comes for diabetes.

My dad a handful of years back suffered from a gastric ulcer. I asked him if he knew what medications he was recommended to stay away from. He just knew that he had to stay away from Advil. I asked him if he knew the generic name in case pain medications in the house weren’t labeled brand name. He didn’t so I had to tell him it is ibuprofen. He said he just knew he could take acetaminophen so he knew to always check for that at least. I also let him know aspirin is not recommended.

In the hospital we commonly experience patients not knowing the names or exact purpose of medications. It’s more common to hear them call their pills by color or shape. I think this is a useful stepping stone for education.

01Mar/17

EBP: Respiratory

Here are some articles I found in regards to respiratory care:

http://summit.csuci.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=104529717&site=ehost-live
-This was interesting because here in the US RTs are so commonplace in the hospital that it’s surprising to hear that in other countries RTs aren’t so common practice.

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267736579_Effectiveness_of_a_Dental_Care_Intervention_in_the_Prevention_of_Lower_Respiratory_Tract_Nosocomial_Infections_among_Intensive_Care_Patients_A_Randomized_Clinical_Trial
-This study looks at the incidence of respiratory tract infections in ICU Patients that received routine oral care from a nurse versus those that received enhanced dental care from a dental surgeon.

 

 

 

01Feb/17

2017

“If you don’t know the guy on the other side of the world, love him anyway because he’s just like you. He has the same dreams, the same hopes and fears. It’s one world, pal. We’re all neighbors.”

-Frank Sinatra

07Oct/15

GI Patient Education: Gastritis

Gastritis is an inflammation of the stomach membrane. It can be caused by many things such as: H. pylori, use of NSAIDs, and exposure to radiation therapy.

The mucosa becomes full of fluid and blood and can even go through erosion or ulceration.

You may feel abdominal discomfort, headache, nausea, vomiting, and hiccuping. Bleeding can occur so you need to tell your doctor if you are experiencing dark stools, bloody stools, or blood in vomit.

It is best for you to stay away from caffeinated beverages, alcohol, and smoking because these could exacerbate your condition. Any finds you find irritate your stomach should be eliminated from your diet.

Any medications like antibiotics or antacids prescribed to you by your doctor should be taken as recommended and finished.

09Sep/15

Renal/GU Drug Review: Lopressor/Metoprolol

Who?
People experiencing high blood pressure. For prevention of MI. Reduction of angina.

What?
Beta Blocker: blocks stimulation of beta-1 adrenergic receptors. This decreases heart rate and blood pressure.

When?
Daily. In a single dose or two divided doses.

Where?
Both hospital (acute) and home settings (chronic).

Why?
Helps control HTN. May delay progression of kidney failure.

How?
Dose: 100-450 mg.
Route: PO or IV.
Safety: bradycardia, hypotension, fatigue and weakness. Due to these side effects fall risk would be a concern.
Do not administer if preadministration pulse is <50.

-Rosa and Leslie