All posts by R. Ozellenebran

03Mar/17

Medications: Do you know what you’re taking?

I interviewed my dad about his medications. He is taking allopurinol, amlodipine and atenolol. Without prompting him he said that the allopurinol is for his gout and the atenolol and amlodipine are for his hypertension. When I asked if he knew any of the side effects of his medications, he stated the following about the medications. For allopurinol, he said it can make him feel drowsy and light headed when he stands up too fast. For atenolol and amlodipine, he said that he sometimes has to get up from sitting or laying down slowly so he does not get light headed. As for his knowledge about safe dosages, he said he did not know them.

During our conversation about the side effects I informed him that atenolol can also cause anxiety, depression, bradycardia and heart failure. He was pretty shocked about them but he asked about the other medications as well. For amlodipine, it can cause edema, angina, and bradycardia. Finally, allopurinol can cause a skin rash and liver injury. Again, he was shocked about these medications. Yet, he also said that he probably should have known about these side effects and that he vaguely remembers that the doctor probably told him about the side effects.

01Mar/17

Respiratory Care Practices

According to the American Association of Respiratory Care (AARC), when starting mechanical ventilation on a patient, there must be ventilator pre-use checks. This must happen for every patient to ensure that everything is working from the engine to the tubing, whenever the circuit is changed and or modified.

When it comes to managing the ventilator settings, only the respiratory therapist can modify or change the settings. If anyone else must modify the settings, he or she must display the same amount of training and level of competency as the respiratory therapist. For ventilator failure, there must always be a set number of machines set aside in case of these emergencies.

Finally, there must always be communication between all the health care practitioners involved in the care of the patient. Set parameters must be established by the providers and must be communicated and made clear to the nurse and respiratory therapist specific to the patient.

14Feb/17

What Cardiopulmonary Arrest Mean to Those Close To You

I asked my parents if they knew what cardiopulmonary arrest meant. My father said a failure of your heart and lungs. On the other hand, my mother, who has been a nurse for over 30 years, answered “It’s another word for a heart attack”. She went on to say that when a patient goes into cardiac arrest, call code and start CPR. When the patient is stabilized, he or she will be sent to the cath lab.

This is something that we all hope will never happen in our careers but we must be prepared. My mom said it so casually that it felt weird since we are talking about someone possibly losing his or her life due to insufficient blood perfusion. Early detection is definitely something to be said about this situation. The earlier it is detected, the faster the treatment would be and the less damage the patient will have on his or her heart.

 

07Feb/17

Healthy Heart Diet

On Saturday, I observed my meals for sodium intake. For the whole day, I ate 3 bananas and 5 crepe snacks filled with hazelnut spread.

3 bananas- 6 mg Na and 1.2 g of fat

6 crepe snacks- 600 mg Na and 42 g of fat

The only reason it was like this was because I was not feeling well. However, thinking back to a patient in a sodium restriction diet, it would be pretty hard since salt does flavor food and makes it more appetizing. For low sodium diet, 2,000 mg of sodium and 1,500 is ideal.

Not only are the patients not in their best shape while in the hospital, they might also have to consume bland foods. It is not an easy task to change someone’s palate, but it may be necessary. Patients might need to look harder into the foods that they put inside their bodies.

02Feb/17

Heart Healthy Diet

I used today to observe the amount of sodium I consume in my meals. I actually do not consume as much sodium as I thought. Since I eat most of my meals at home, the salt in our foods are limited.

However, thinking back to a patient in a sodium restriction diet, it would be pretty hard since salt does flavor food and makes it more appetizing. Not only are the patients not in their best shape while in the hospital, they might also have to consume bland foods. It is not an easy task to change someone’s palate, but it may be necessary.

24Sep/15

Liver Cancer

Group Members: Rozelle Nebran, Bernadette Entezami, Duan Nguyen, Kara Mead, Jamie Allison

What is it?

  • Liver Cancer

Who gets it?

  • Chronic alcoholics, Hepatitis B and C, exposure to chemical toxins, cigarette smokers, toxic molds

When should you seek care?

  • When you experience continuous dull ache in right upper quadrant, epigastrium, or your back
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Anorexia
  • Loss of strength
  • Anemia

Where (specific organ)?

  • Liver

Why does it happen?

  • combination of lifestyle, genetic factors, and environmental exposures

Treatment 

  • Surgical resection
  • Radiation therapy
  • Chemotherapy
  • Percutaneous biliary drainage
  • Liver transplant
  • Lobectomy
  • Local Ablation